Cirsova on Shane Plays

Weekend before last, I was on the radio with Shane Plays, our local weekend geek news show.

You can listen to the episode online here:

https://shaneplays.com/heroic-fantasy-science-fiction-cirsova-magazine-radio-show-podcast-episode-166/

Quick note on submissions: We are buried but making slow progress. Remember than “soon” and “shortly” are relative terms when we say that we will read your stories “soon” and get back with you “shortly” thereafter.

As of right now, we’re about 1/3 of the way through nearly a hundred manuscripts. Due to the volume, we will be making very few immediate offers on stories and will be weighing our options on our many “maybes” once we’ve made more progress on the “stack”.

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Will Cirsova Crowdfund?

No. We won’t.

Recently it was revealed that not only had Kickstarter blocked Richard Meyer’s Jawbreakers campaign for alleged TOS violations [it was, as I understand an apolitical comic, and despite being mildly too salty for people with emotional hypertension, Richard is a fairly apolitical guy], they leaked their communications with him to Richard Pace who dumped them all over Twitter.

Now, IndieGoGo decided to tank Chuck Dixon’s Alt-Hero Q project after it had finished funding for nebulous claims that it had violated their terms of service. Backers have been refunded their money, but there’s nothing on the project page that would seem to violate the terms of service. IndieGoGo pulled the plug on Alt-Hero Q the same day that a Bleeding Cool article featuring an in-depth interview with Vox Day was posted. Following the outcry of their lunatic readers, Bleeding Cool took down the article and issued an apology. This is certainly not a coincidence.

Cirsova has never really NEEDED to crowdfund. All of our projects are finished and paid for by the time that the Kickstarters have gone live, which is how we’ve been able to ship out as soon as the money clears. Before the Alt-Hero Q incident, we had considered moving to IndieGoGo; we even have an extensive Illustrated Stark project page setup and waiting for us to flip the go-live switch. This changes things, however. Going forward, we plan on taking our products straight to print, making them available on Amazon and through retailers without spending a month flogging a crowdfunding event.

We hope you will stick with us despite no longer using these platforms.

[Disclosure: While I backed for Chuck Dixon’s Alt-Hero: Avalon on Freestartr, a platform that was recently murdered by its payment processor, I was not a backer of either Jawbreakers or Alt-Hero Q.]

Submissions! Where Are We?

Under a pile of them, that’s for sure!

We’re just a little over a week in, and we’ve received nearly 70 submissions! With three weeks to go, we could easily receive over 200 more!

In the past, we tended to respond right away, one way or the other, on stories we received, but back then we did not quite have the tight budget constraints that we have now. With competition so heated for our 2019 space, more stories that would be off-the-bat “Accepts” are necessarily falling into the “Maybe” category. These will be weighed against one another once we have made more headway into the slush pile.

So, where are we in the slush pile?

About 20 stories in. Things have gone a bit slowly, in part, because we haven’t had any stories yet that we just tossed out straight-away.

As we make progress this week, we’ll begin letting Strong Maybes know their pieces are still under consideration, and we’ll be sending out the first batch of rejections around the same time. If your story is rejected, you are welcome to submit another story.

 

Submissions Update!

We’ve begun our reading period, and with great enthusiasm and excitement, we have begun to dive into your submissions.

There are a few things I’d like to touch on:

  • While we don’t have a hard word-count cap, you’re better off submitting something short than something long. With only 100k words of space available at present, we’re not going to have room for many novelettes [and many Cirsova novelettes are JUST over the category cut-off]. You stand a much better chance of getting in with a 2500-5000 word story than with a 10,000-15,000 word story.
  • Present-tense is kind of a “no” for us. Our first issue had a story in present tense, and even though I loved it [in spite of the tense], we got a lot of negative feedback on that aspect of the story, we recommend only sending us stories written in past-tense.
  • We don’t have a hard and fast rule on multiple submissions, but unless you have prior arrangements made with us, please do not send more than two at a time and be aware that, unless you have a prior arrangement with us, chances are that we will only take one of them.
  • We can’t tell you which story you should submit to us. If you ask us which you think would be a better fit, we’d just be guessing if we haven’t read it.
  • Being our bro online, being part of the PulpRev community, etc. does not guarantee you a slot in our magazine. Even being generous, consider that within 24 hours, we’ve received over 40 submissions and will likely purchase no more than 12. Competition will be FIERCE. Things may be, or seem, naturally weighted in favor of past contributors, however, because it’s already established that we love their stories, but with the limited space, there are still no guarantees. Do not let this discourage you; just be aware of the constraints we’re under.
  • When we say “we will get back with you soon”, we mean “no later than November”. If you don’t hear from us right away in October, it means a) we still haven’t read your story, or b) we’ve read your story and are holding onto it as a “maybe”.
  • Payment is on acceptance.

Submissions are Open!

We’re accepting Submissions now for Cirsova volume 2.

Details are here.

We’re looking to acquire ~100K words in text in total. That’s enough to fill two issues of Cirsova.

Payment is .0125 per word. That’s less on the short end than we used to pay, but more on the long-end. [mostly it keeps our expenses flat, which we need on such a tight budget, as opposed to when we paid a .01 cent bonus on the first 2500 words and costs fluctuated based on the number of stories rather than actual wordcounts.]