The Ideological Conquest of Science Fiction Literature (via The QuQu/QuQu Media)

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4 responses to “The Ideological Conquest of Science Fiction Literature (via The QuQu/QuQu Media)

  1. The creator does make one overstatement in saying prior to Tolkien Howard was the model. Appendix N alone gives the lie to that.

    If there was any universal author I would say it was Dunsany. As Ursula LeGuin said in “The Language of the Night” every fantasy author goes through a period of writing Dunsany pastiche. I know I wrote atrocious Dunsany pastiche in my JHS years.

    I need to take a hand at writing some mere bad Dunsany pastiche actually.

    Otherwise this isn’t too bad. I think I’ll make it vidoe of the week on my Monday Pointers post.

    • Howard certainly became the model for heroic fantasy, and his influence is probably felt more directly among science-fantasy writers of the 40s that I’ve read than Dunsany’s but you still have a good point.

      Ironically, I just reread Lovecraft’s Quest of Iranon which was published in the issue of Weird I’ve been working my way through – it’s one of his more egregiously Dunsanian stories, and while there’s some moving and emotive aspects to it, it pales in compared with what Dunsany could do with far fewer words in his earliest Pegana stories.

      Though my last two stories were very much influenced by Brackett and CL Moore, the aim of CYOA I wrote was to see if I could write a Dunsanian fantasy in that format. (You can, but often with unsatisfying narrative outcomes).

      • Dunsany is a writer of that very evil kind.

        You read Dunsany and it is pretty and lyrical and airy and looks so simple. I suspect that is why LeGuin knew so many fantasy writers who did a turn at Dunsany pastiche.

        I mean, it does look so easy.

        Then you try and write it.

        I suspect those writers who succeed at it stand up from their desk upon writing their first successful Dunsany style story with his brevity and lyrical nature and yell, “Plunket you magnificent bastard, I read your books.”

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