Gundam Best Girl Sayla + Michael Tierney Talks About the Comic Industry Shutdown

Back in February, we held a UC Gundam Best Girl Tournament.

We promised that we’d draw the winner of tournament on the art cover of Hell Arisen #1 and auction it off to raise money for Cirsova. Then I got really sick for several weeks. But here it is, Sayla Mass, who was crowned by the People as UC Gundam’s Best Girl. It’s on eBay here.

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Also, on Saturday, Michael Tierney spoke with RJ Carter of Critical Blast about the state of the comics industry in the wake of the Diamond distribution shutdown in response to COVID19.

Black Gate Interview with Mongoose and Meerkat Author, Jim Breyfolge

6 x 9 coverBlack Gate has posted an interview we did with Mongoose and Meerkat author, Jim Breyfogle!

You can read it here!

Be sure to hit the “Notify Me on Launch” button on our Kickstarter, which goes live on Wednesday!

Also, if you haven’t already, grab a copy of the latest issue of Cirsova featuring the all new Mongoose and Meerkat adventure, The Golden Pearl! I you have, leave a review!

One last cool bit of news, I’ll be on the Bunderdome with Mark Pellegrini this wednesday, talking about Mongoose and Meerkat, Michael’s comic store and his Wild Stars, the magazine and more!

Be sure to tune in!

 

 

Short Reviews – The Man Who Forgot, by Charles Creighton

The Man Who Forgot by Charles Creighton appeared in the February 1951 issue of Amazing Stories. It can be read hereat Archive.org.

The Man Who Forgot

This issue offers up yet another thriller with Charles Creighton’s The Man Who Forgot.

A man wakes up amnesiac on Mars; all he remembers is that he was from earth. Right away, he gets sucked into intrigue when he meets Clara, a beautiful martian woman and loyalist, and Karn, her shifty brother who is a secessionist and member of the Martian Secret Police.

The woman introduces the man to her family as Rand Beecher, a chess historian, with the hopes that it will buy him some cover and keep her brother from taking too much an interest in him.

Turns out that the opposite is true: Karn takes “Rand” to meet a fellow secessionist, to reveal the plot that’s afoot. In fact, whomever “Rand” is, he bears a striking resemblance to the real Rand Beecher and is familiar with his works. Karn and his ally Aaron have a proposition for Rand–as a brilliant chessmaster, it’s the opportunity of a lifetime: the chance to dispassionately plan out an actual war. A war of Martian secession.

Trying to unravel the mystery of his identity, Rand concludes a number of possibilities. The most likely is that he is an earth sleeper agent, either the real Rand, or someone who resembled him, programmed by hypnosis to infiltrate the secession movement. He would either give them bad strategy or good strategy, and either harm the Martian rebel effort by misdirection or the sheer fact that whomever had set him up on earth already knew whatever gambits he had to offer the Martians. In all likelihood, he was set up with Clara’s family because of the easy contact with Karn or because the loyalists in the family were in on the operation… Or are they?

This was a pretty exciting little spy-fi adventure with a lot of twists and turns as the mystery of Rand’s real identity unravels. I don’t want to go into it too much, lest I spoil it too badly. This one’s worth reading, for sure.

Enjoy exciting pulpy adventures? Be sure to check out the new issue of Cirsova out now!

Also, don’t forget to click Notify me on Launch for our upcoming Mongoose & Meerkat Kickstarter launching next week!

Review of Jim Breyfogle’s The Golden Pearl

Nathan Housley over at Castalia House has reviewed the latest Mongoose & Meerkat story from Jim Breyfogle, The Golden Pearl.

With this aquatic adventure, Mangos and Kat cement themselves as Cirsova’s answer to Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser.

You can read the whole review here.

The Golden Pearl, by Jim Breyfogle, appears in Cirsova #3, Out Now.

Catch up on all of Mangos and Kat’s adventures in Tales of the Mongoose and Meerkat Volume 1: Pursuit Without Asking, coming soon from Cirsova Publishing!

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Summer Special Advertisements Available!

The Summer Special will be upon us soon [slated for May 23rd]!

We need to fill advertising slots ASAP! Our rates are here.

[Note that the back cover ad slot is already taken for this issue!]

This is a particularly good deal for editors, artists, designers and other freelancers to find clients who may be looking for work from indie authors.

Summer Special 2 2020 cover 0.03 Front Only

 

Short Reviews – Vanguard of the Doomed, by ???? as Gerald Vance

Vanguard of the Doomed is credited as by Gerald Vance, an Amazing Stories house name shared by several authors. The actual author of Vanguard of the Doomed is unknown. It appeared in the February 1951 issue of Amazing Stories and can be read here at Archive.org.

Vanguard of the Doomed

A short-wave radio enthusiast and electronics engineer meets a girl over the air-waves. While she’s short and coy, the guy ends up absolutely head over heels for her, and she seems to like him. So when she cryptically signs off, telling him she’ll get in contact with him later if she can, then doesn’t show up for over a week, he worries begins to worry and decides to investigate.

What ensues is a tense, fairly action-packed post-war sci-fi thriller. Turns out the dame is the secretary of a mad scientist… who is actually an ex-Nazi posing as the mad scientist he’s done away with and using the mad scientist’s mad science to strike a blow for a resurrected Reich. Anyway, she’s stumbled on his secret plan to draw a planetoid referred to by astronomers and the media as “The Celestial Hammer”.

Remember the Max Fleischer Superman cartoon, where the astronomer has a magnet ray that he uses to get a better look at asteroids and meteors by directing them closer to earth and disaster ensues? Basically that, but the guy is doing it on purpose because he’s a Nazi and he’s gonna hold the world for ransom Cobra Commander style.

One interesting tidbit is that the Nazi villain is named Max Borzeny. Now, Borzney isn’t a real German name, but a thinly disguised spin on Skorzeny. Otto Skorzeny’s exploits in the war brought his profile much higher than his rank and responsibilities–he was larger-than-life boogeyman both feared and admired by Allies. The Borzeny in the story bears little resemblance to Skorzeny, but it is indicative of some of the mystique of SS Commando who, only a few years later, would be turned into ‘a real life pulp hero’ in Charles Foley’s hagiography Commando Extraordinary. Also worth noting, that despite being a relatively minor figure in the Reich, Skorzeny would go on after the war to basically become the real life Red Skull.