A Shout-Out for Illustrated Stark

We recently got a shout-out on Cora Buhlert’s blog for our new edition of Leigh Brackett’s Stark:

Interestingly, the most recent editions by Cirsova Publishing of all companies, are the first to actually portray Eric John Stark as Leigh Brackett described him, namely as a black man.

In her post, Cora talks about how the Golden Age of Science Fiction was more diverse than it’s generally given credit for as she takes a look at the 2019 and the 1944 Retro Hugo Awards nominees (the latter of which includes a couple Brackett stories!).

One of the focuses of our own pulp review series at Castalia House (rerunning here through the end of the year) was to illustrate that the pulps were not what people have thought they were by showing what they actually were. And few if any of the nearly 150 stories we reviewed were anything like the strawman of the pulps one often hears about.

Several stories we reviewed, including Spider Men of Gharr, the Stark Stories, and more recently The Dead-Star Rover, featured non-white protagonists and/or explicitly interracial couples. Women not only were reading the pulps, they were writing them too, and we proved that “Leigh Brackett hid her gender behind her ambiguous name” was a myth, with fans referring to her as “Miss” and editors correcting letter writers who used “he.” We’ve looked at the “unexplored colonialism” meme and found that, at least in 1940s Planet Stories, the morality of colonialism and native plight were being explored, often with native Martians or Venusians as stand-in for indigenous peoples, seeking to answer the question of “How could we have done things better and treated these people with dignity?”

As for why Stark is black in our edition of Leigh Brackett’s Stark books: We love Leigh Brackett, we love Stark, and we love these stories, and we wanted to do them justice with art and illustrations from StarTwo that truly depict the stories and bring them to life. It would’ve been ridiculous for us to do it any other way!

Our edition of Enchantress of Venus is out now, and Black Amazon of Mars drops on June 28th with a foreword by Liana Kerzner.

Black Amazon of Mars Front Only

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70th Anniversary Illustrated Edition of Leigh Brackett’s Enchantress of Venus Out Today!

Dark Secrets of an Inhuman Race Lie Hidden Beneath the Seas of Venus!

Eric John Stark travels the shores of Venus’ gaseous red seas seeking the whereabouts of a missing comrade. Pursuing this mystery puts him in the hands of the Lhari, a cruel and power-hungry family that rules over the pirate enclave of Shuruun!

Beneath the waves, the Lhari’s doomed slaves live and toil among ancient ruins, seeking out the lost super-weapon of the precursors. And Stark must join them or die!

If Varra, a vain and petty Lhari princess, can control both Stark and this lost weapon, all of Venus may be within her grasp!

An all new edition of Leigh Brackett’s classic planetary romance, fully illustrated by StarTwo and with a foreword by Jeffro Johnson, author of Appendix N: A Literary History of Dungeons & Dragons!

Enchantress Cover for ebook

Reminder: Leigh Brackett’s Enchantress of Venus Out This Friday (5/31/2019)

Dark Secrets of an Inhuman Race Lie Hidden Beneath the Seas of Venus!

Eric John Stark travels the shores of Venus’ gaseous red seas seeking the whereabouts of a missing comrade. Pursuing this mystery puts him in the hands of the Lhari, a cruel and power-hungry family that rules over the pirate enclave of Shuruun!

Beneath the waves, the Lhari’s doomed slaves live and toil among ancient ruins, seeking out the lost super-weapon of the precursors. And Stark must join them or die!

If Varra, a vain and petty Lhari princess, can control both Stark and this lost weapon, all of Venus may be within her grasp!

Enchantress Cover for ebook