High level design concept for a Fangbone! tabletop game

This is really just a broadside, where I’d start if I were to make a Fangbone! tabletop game. Needless to say, there’s no nitty-gritty, yet, because I just came up with this in the shower the other day – plus, since it’s a branded IP that I’m not affiliated with in any way nor being paid to design for, fleshing this out into something playable is extremely low on my list of priorities. Still, I thought I’d share.

Fangbone!_production_art

2-4 players

Character-deck based, similar to Red Dragon Inn.

Players:

  1. Drool
  2. Fangbone
  3. Bill
  4. CID

Note that for 2 players, player 2 controls both Fangbone and Bill characters/decks.

Game starts with the Fangbone player in possession of the Toe of Drool.

Drool player plays monsters, cards to enhance monsters, and cards that directly affect human players.

Drool player’s objective is to a) gain the Toe, b) open portal to Skullbania and get the Toe through. A monster gaining the Toe leads to a “sudden death” of X rounds before the Toe is lost and Drool player wins.

Fangbone/Bill player(s) goal is to defeat X number of Drool’s monsters while keeping the Toe between the two characters/players. Fangbone/Bill players always win and lose as a team (b/c battlebros). Certain cards may enable trading the Toe between characters – e.g., a monster seizes Toe from Fangbone, Fangbone player has a card allowing him to pass the Toe to another character to keep Drool player from capturing it.

CID player’s goal is to be in possession of the Toe when Drool’s final monster is defeated in the round. CID player may actively help or hinder Fangbone/Bill player(s) throughout the course of the game, but will lose if Drool possesses the Toe and opens the portal.

Drool would have two decks; one would consist of monsters and minions with different strengths and abilities-a round would begin with Drool playing a monster/minion with which he will attempt to seize the Toe. The other deck would consist of spells and actions that would allow the monster to take the Toe, evade attacks, weaken other player’s characters. Monster would have its own stats and fixed set of actions it could take in addition to those played by Drool.

Human players would have cards similar to the monster, but actions would be limited to playable cards. Characters have a limited amount of “health” each round. If the character becomes KOed, they lose action(s) and the player/character/monster that KOed them takes possession of the Toe.

Fangbone’s deck would consist largely of offensive actions, featuring weapons, animals, and Skullbanian characters.

Bill’s deck would consist largely of defensive actions, featuring earth stuff, classmates, etc. Bill’s damaging actions would make up a smaller portion of his deck, which instead would provide assists, and combos to Fangbone and recover/prevent loss of the Toe. Slightly more health recovery cards.

Cid’s deck would consist of thiefy “Shadowstepper” tricks, largely to prevent damage, prevent loss of the Toe, and to take control of the Toe.

Note that for balance, a game featuring Cid or any other additional characters, Drool player may need additional cards/actions/monsters.

If I were somehow tasked with actual creation of a licensed Fangbone game, I’d almost certainly opt to take these design notes and approach experienced card game designers (Red Dragon Inn or Epic Spell Wars teams) with additional setting info, characters, monsters, cards, and go from there rather than try to build it myself from the ground up. But hey, the 1st stage thinky work is already done!

And the 500th post is: New OSR Class: The Monk (UPDATED!)

I’ve gone and made some tweaks and fixes to the Monk class I wrote up.  For one thing, I’ve made it match the format of the Prodigal Apprentice.

 

Character Concept: Cleric/Rogue
HD: 1d6 (Progress as Thief beyond 9th Level)
Prime Requisite: Wis
Equipment: May not wear Armor, no Shield
Weapons: Restricted to Dagger & Staff
Save:  As Cleric of Same Level
XP Progression: Thief
To Hit: Thief
Class Ability: Turning, Thief Abilities, Herbalism, Scribe/Use Divine Scrolls,
Spell Progression: As Cleric (See Scribe/Use Divine Scrolls)

Turning

The Monk may turn undead as a Cleric of the two levels lower than himself/herself. Cannot Turn until 3rd Level.

Thief Abilities

The Monk possesses the Thief Abilities of a Thief of the one level lower than himself/herself; at 1st Level: Open Locks(10), Remove Traps(5), Pick Pockets(20), Move Silently(15), Climb Sheer Surfaces(86), Hide in Shadows(5), Hear Noise(1-2).

Scribe/Use Divine Scrolls

The Monk may not cast divine spells, however, he may scribe and use scrolls of divine spells provided that a)he is accompanied by a cleric who is able to cast the divine spell during the process of scribing the scroll; and b)the Monk is of sufficient level to scribe the scroll (See Cleric Spell progression chart).  The Monk may only use as many divine scrolls in a day as his level allows, treating the scrolls as though they were the daily spells of a Cleric of the same level.

Herbalism

The Monk may use his skills as an herbalist to collect herbs to use as curatives or poisons.  To create curatives or poisons, the Monk must first collect ingredients.

Collecting herbs from the garden

While at his or her home monastery, abbey or convent, the Monk will have a 90% chance of succeeding in finding required herbs.  At an unfamiliar monastery, abbey or convent, the Monk will have a 70% chance of succeeding in finding required herbs. In both cases, these represent herbs and plants that are readily available from the monastery’s garden.

Collecting herbs in the wilderness

Finding and collecting herbs in the wilderness may be more difficult; attempting to collect herbs in a wilderness area takes 1 hour unless the situation dictates otherwise.

1 20% chance per day
2 25% chance per day
3 30% chance per day
4 35% chance per day
5 40% chance per day
6 45% chance per day
7 50% chance per day
8 55% chance per day
9 60% chance per day
10 65% chance per day
11 70% chance per day
12 75% chance per day
13 80% chance per day
14 85% chance per day

The Monk’s Wisdom increases his chances of successfully finding the required ingredients by 5% for each +1 modifier.

Creating Curatives/Poisons

The Monk must choose what kind of cure or poison he intends to create before collecting herbs.  Unless properly stored (kept in dry places, bottles, jars, etc.), herbs will lose their efficacy after 1d4 days. Healing ointments, after mixed, retain their efficacy for 2d4 days if properly stored.

Poultice of healing (1st-5th Level) (1 turn to create)

When applied, will restore 2d6 hit points after 12 hours. These are in addition to any hit points restored naturally by resting.

Greater Poultice of healing (6th Level+) (2 turns to create)

When applied, will restore 1d6 hit points instantly, and will restore 2d6 hit points after 12 hours. These are in addition to any hit points restored naturally by resting.

Disinfecting ointment (1st-5th Level) (1 turn to create)

When applied, will restore 1d6 hit points after 12 hours and allow for an additional saving throw at +2 against a non-magical disease* contracted from the bites of normal animals.

Greater Disinfecting ointment (6th Level+) (2 turns to create)

When applied, will restore 1d6 hit points after 12 hours and cure non-magical disease* caused by the bites of normal animals and allow for an additional saving throw at +2 against a magical disease.

Antidote (1st-5th Level) (2 turns to create)

When consumed, grants an additional saving against any non-magical poison** from the sting or bite of normal animals.

Greater Antidote (6th Level+) (3 turns to create)

When consumed, grants an additional saving throw against any magical poison or will counter any non-magical poison** from the sting or bite of normal animals after 1 hour.

Bodily cleanse (1st-5th Level) (1 turn to create)

When consumed, will cure any non-magical disease* within 1d12 hours.

Greater Bodily Cleanse (6th Level+) (2 turns to create)

When consumed, will instantly cure any non-magical disease, grants an additional saving throw against magical disease.

Poison of Weakness (1st-5th Level) (1 hour to create)

The victim must save vs. poison or suffer a -4 penalty on all rolls and a -2 penalty on physical stats within 1d12 hours after the poison is consumed.

Greater Poison of Weakness (6th Level) (2 hours to create)

The victim must save vs. poison or suffer a -8 penalty on rolls and a -4 penalty on physical stats within 1d12 hours after the poison is consumed.

Deadly Poison (1st-5th Level) (4 hours to create)

The victim must save vs. Poison or suffer 1d6 damage per hour until an antidote is administered or the victim dies. Victims who succeed in their saving throw take only 1d6 damage.

Greater Deadly Poison (6th Level+) (8 hours to create)

The victim must save vs. Poison or suffer 2d6 damage per hour until an antidote is administered or the victim dies. Victims who succeed in their saving throw must make a second save vs. Poison; if the victim fails the second saving throw, he or she will suffer 1d6 damage per hour until an antidote is administered or he or she dies. If the victim succeeds in their second saving throw, the victim takes only 1d6 damage.

*: Diseases not caused by magical/mythical creatures or spells

**: Any poison not specified as magic in nature.

At Lvl 1, Brother Andrews successfully completes his first investigation, discovering that Brother Vinos has been the one stealing ale from the abbey cellar.

At Lvl 1, Brother Andrews successfully completes his first investigation, discovering that Brother Thaddeus has been the one stealing ale from the abbey cellar.

Mechanics for a board game: tactical level D&D minus the D&D

This started as a comment left over at Rumors of War, but I feel it bears saving and posting here for posterity, as well, with some additions and (a little) polish.

As anyone who follows here knows, I’m a big fan of the old hex & chit wargames.  And Dither was pondering over the idea of characters as the stats of a party.  So I got to thinking about how each chit in a wargame breaks down the necessary values of a unit into the simplest bits of information that can be plugged into a combat resolution engine.

So, here’s what I’ve come up with:

All parties can be represented by a piece with the following values: (w)X-Y-Z

w = Skirmish/archery value
X = Melee value
Y = Magic value
Z = Defense/Morale value

w = number of rogues/archers in the party; attacks and damage resolved in a skirmish round
X = number of Fighters; Melee attack rating
Y = number of mages & clerics; Magic attack/defense rating
Z = number of fighters + 1/2 number of non-fighters; defensive/morale value.

So, each party member would act as a component of the unit, adding to the whole it’s value as follows:

Melee Fighter = (0)1-0-1
Ranged Fighter = (1)0-0-1
Thief/Rogue = (1)0-0-1/2
Cleric = 0-1-1/2
Mage = 0-1-1/2

Now, this is HIGHLY simplified, but that’s kind of the point.

A party with a Fighter, a Ranger, a Magic User, and a Cleric would be
(1)1 – 2 – 3.  Originally, I’d considered having a ranger add to both skirmish and melee, but I decided that would kind of ‘break’ the ranger, making the ranged fighter the most powerful single individual.  He does, however, add more to the Defense/Morale value than a rogue/thief would.

Combat:
Combat would occur after the movement step and in 4 phases.  Phase 1 is the attacker skirmish phase. Phase 2 is attacker melee phase. Phase 3 is the optional defender counterattack phase.  Phase 4 is resolution, where units retreat and are assigned negative (-) markers.

The following negative markers can be assigned (-1) -0 -0 -1, (-0)-1, -0, -1, and (-0) -0, -1, -1.

Attacker:
Skirmish – roll 1d8; if the roll is equal to or lower than the attacker’s skirmish value, the attack is considered successful

Melee – roll 1d8; if the roll is equal to or lower than the attacker’s melee value, the attack is considered successful

Magic – If attacker’s magic is higher than defenders, subtract the difference from EITHER the Melee or Skirmish roll. If the defender’s magic is higher than the attacker’s, add the difference to both the Melee and Skirmish roll.

Defender:
If no attack was successful – roll 1d8; if the roll is lower than the unit’s defense score, the defender may make a counter-attack using it’s skirmish value.
If a skirmish attack was successful, but no melee attack was made or successful against defending unit – roll 1d8; if the roll is lower than the unit’s defense score, the unit may retreat or stand its ground. If the roll is equal to or above the defending unit’s defense score, the unit must retreat and you must choose and place (-) marker on the unit.
If a melee attack was successful, but no skirmish attack was made or successful against defending unit – roll 1d8; if the roll is lower than the unit’s defense score, the unit may retreat or it may stand its ground and you must  place a (-0) -1 -0 -1 marker on the unit. If the roll is equal to or greater than the defending unit’s defense score, the unit must retreat and you must choose and place a (-)  marker on the unit.
If both a skirmish and a melee attack are successful – roll 1d8; if the roll is lower than the unit’s defense score, the unit must retreat and you must choose to place  a (-) marker on the unit. If the roll is equal to or greater than the defending unit’s defense score, the unit must retreat and the attacking player may choose place two (-) markers on the unit.

A (-1) -0 -0 -1 marker may only be placed on a unit whose skirmish value is greater than 0.

A (-0)-1 -0 -1 marker may only be placed on a unit whose melee value is greater than 0.

A (-0)-0 -1 -1 marker may only be placed on a unit whose magic value is greater than 0.

A unit whose defense score is 0 is eliminated.

If a unit is not threatened by an adjacent unit, and has a magic value greater than 0, it may recover on its owner’s turn by removing a single (-) marker.

No hex may have a combined unit defense value greater than 8. No unit may be formed with a defense value greater than 8.

Scaling combat for Dungeons & Dragons. Scores are fixed for Heroes while monsters are scaled against the heroes’ average level.

Level 1, 1-0-1 would represent a single 1HD monster. 5-0-5 would represent 5HD worth of monsters

Level 2, 1-0-1 would represent a single 2HD monster or 2 1HD monsters. 5-0-5 would represent 5 2HD monsters or 10 1HD monsters.

Level 5, 1-0-1 would represent a single 5HD monster, a 1HD monster and a 4HD monster, a 2HD and a 3HD monster, 2 2HD and 1 1HD monster.

I know it’s a lot to ask to cram your HD worth of monsters into the ascribed value(s), but it’s a small sacrifice to make for doing some heavy-duty tactical stuff using a simplified combat system.

Actual monster deaths and character injuries can be adjudicated based on remaining defense values after the tactical scenario has concluded.