The New Woke Weird Tales

I’ll admit, I was incredibly apprehensive when I first saw that the most fabled name in pulps was yet again being resurrected for another zombie run cash-in on pulp nostalgia.

You guys know how I feel about that sort of stuff.

But to add insult to injury, Weird Tales is being relaunched with the editor explicitly condemning the original title as sexist, racist and homophobic.

New Weird Tales

If you think Weird Tales was such a bunch of regressive reprobate garbage, why did you buy it? Why are you selling it with an homage to a cover by the woman who made the magazine famous with tawdry paintings of lesbians flogging one another?

It’s because nostalgia sells.

It seems like a common modus operandi today to get ahold of a property just to crap it up.

I hate this sort of thing, because this is the sort of denigration of the pulps that actively discourages new readers from actually digging into them and seeing what they were really like. “Oh, don’t buy that old Weird Tales with its bad wrongthink stories; buy the new one, we promise we won’t offend your modern sensibilities!”

If you’re an author who would otherwise have considered submitting to Weird Tales, give us a look instead. We pay semi-pro rates for fiction [0.0125 per word] and will be opening in the October. Details are available in our submissions guidelines linked at the top of the page.

Or if you’re a reader who enjoys weird fiction and the pulps, give us a look. Our new issue will be out next month and features some great science fiction, fantasy, and classic weird horror.

2-2 Cover v 0.01 Front Only jpg

Lastly, don’t forget Wild Stars! If you want us to be able to continue doing what we’re doing, and especially want to support us in a way that will give us more funds to acquire stories in the Fall, be sure to back Wild Stars back Wild Stars!  Money we make from this project WILL be available in time for us to figure it into our acquisitions budget.

Back Covers

 

Wild Stars Mega Round Up Post

We’ve been talking about the Wild Stars and plugging it all over the place, so we thought it would be a good idea to do a round-up post!

We’ve only got two weeks left in the Wild Stars IndieGoGo, and we REALLY NEED TO HIT THAT $8K goal! Especially if you guys want more Cirsova Magazine in 2020. This project’s will give us the funds we need to make it happen!

The Wild Stars Twitter Megathread

B/X D&D Stats for Griefs

Michael Tierney and P. Alexander on Shane Plays:

P. Alexander on Geek Gab:

P. Alexander on Superversive SF:

 

A Shout-Out for Illustrated Stark

We recently got a shout-out on Cora Buhlert’s blog for our new edition of Leigh Brackett’s Stark:

Interestingly, the most recent editions by Cirsova Publishing of all companies, are the first to actually portray Eric John Stark as Leigh Brackett described him, namely as a black man.

In her post, Cora talks about how the Golden Age of Science Fiction was more diverse than it’s generally given credit for as she takes a look at the 2019 and the 1944 Retro Hugo Awards nominees (the latter of which includes a couple Brackett stories!).

One of the focuses of our own pulp review series at Castalia House (rerunning here through the end of the year) was to illustrate that the pulps were not what people have thought they were by showing what they actually were. And few if any of the nearly 150 stories we reviewed were anything like the strawman of the pulps one often hears about.

Several stories we reviewed, including Spider Men of Gharr, the Stark Stories, and more recently The Dead-Star Rover, featured non-white protagonists and/or explicitly interracial couples. Women not only were reading the pulps, they were writing them too, and we proved that “Leigh Brackett hid her gender behind her ambiguous name” was a myth, with fans referring to her as “Miss” and editors correcting letter writers who used “he.” We’ve looked at the “unexplored colonialism” meme and found that, at least in 1940s Planet Stories, the morality of colonialism and native plight were being explored, often with native Martians or Venusians as stand-in for indigenous peoples, seeking to answer the question of “How could we have done things better and treated these people with dignity?”

As for why Stark is black in our edition of Leigh Brackett’s Stark books: We love Leigh Brackett, we love Stark, and we love these stories, and we wanted to do them justice with art and illustrations from StarTwo that truly depict the stories and bring them to life. It would’ve been ridiculous for us to do it any other way!

Our edition of Enchantress of Venus is out now, and Black Amazon of Mars drops on June 28th with a foreword by Liana Kerzner.

Black Amazon of Mars Front Only

Illustrated Stark Merch Available Now!

Illustrated Stark begins coming out on 4/30–that’s tomorrow!

So, to celebrate, we’ve added some cool Stark stuff to the Merch Store:

Stark Merch

Tomorrow:

Leigh Brackett’s Illustrated Stark Deluxe Hardcover Edition

Leigh Brackett’s Queen of the Martian Catacombs

5/31/2019

Leigh Brackett’s The Enchantress of Venus

6/28/2019

Leigh Brackett’s Black Amazon of Mars

7/31/2019

Leigh Brackett’s The Complete Illustrated Stark softcover collection.

One Week and One Day Till Illustrated Stark!

The trade paperback of Queen of the Martian Catacombs, along with the deluxe hardcover omnibus, drops a week from Tuesday!

How well these two titles do will have direct bearing on how much money we will have in our budget to acquire new stories in the fall.

If you want more Cirsova in 2020, be sure to order today! (The first sales revenues for Stark will begin paying out in August).

To keep us afloat until then, consider taking out an ad in our Summer Special!

Cover Only JPG

Michael Tierney’s Wild Stars (Backer Reward Breakdown + Add-Ons)

We’re on track to hopefully raise $4000 for Michael Tierney’s Wild Stars.

We’ve unlocked a LOT of stretch goals, and I think we will hit more, so I wanted to highlight what it is we’re offering and what you’ll get for backing:

$5

  • Electronic copy of the new Wild Stars novella

$10

  • Electronic and softcover copy the new Wild Stars novella
  •  All 7 issues of the 2002 Wild Stars comic run*
  • The Force Majeure: Prairie Bay comic*

$15

  • All of the above
  • Multiversal Scribe Magazine

$25

  • All of the above
  • The 1984 & 1988 Wild Star Comics, Erlik and First Marker.

$45 (ONE LEFT!)

  • All of the above
  • Across the Distance and Wild Stars art portfolios

Add Ons:

  • Spider-Raft Variant Cover ($10)**
  • Hardcover ($30 US, $35 non-US)***

*:Free to US backers; due to international postage rates, non-US backers will need to increase their pledge by an additional $40 to receive these comics.

**: Backers may choose from either cover or pledge an additional $10 to receive both copies (no additional S&H)

***: Hardcovers may be shipped/fulfilled separately—this allows us to save on international shipping to make them more affordable to non-US backers.

cover

low res of Mark's version of the cover

Multiversal ScribeFMPBCOVERcolorWild Stars 3 coversWild Stars 1 and 2

Space Elves – Circa 1933

In the pulps, even Mars had its strange and fey races:

He had knelt on the bank, and was just parting the rushes, when a reflection in the water before him made him look up. A huge black bat was pursuing what at first glance appeared to be a large butterfly. Apparently disabled, the smaller creature fluttered groundward, falling into the rushes not ten feet from Thorne.

In a steep spiral, the bat swooped toward its fallen prey. Leaping to his feet, Thorne saw the futile fluttering of a pair of lacy, opalescent wings above the rushes, and knew that in a moment more the bat would claim its victim. He jerked a javelin from his quiver and hurled it at the descending monster. It struck the black, furry neck with such force that the barbed head emerged from the other side.

Now it was the bat which tumbled into the rushes, only a few feet from the creature it had struck down.

Having satisfied himself that the ugly thing was dead, Thorne stepped over for a closer look at its intended prey. But as he did so, the lacy wings suddenly rose above the bushes, and he stifled a cry of amazement when he saw that they were attached to the shoulders of a slender, perfectly formed girl about three feet in height.

Save for a girdle of filmy, pale green material drawn tight at the waist by a belt of exquisitely wrought golden mesh and ending in a short skirt, she was nude. Her silky skin was a perfect flesh tint, and covered with fine down, delicate as peach bloom. Her golden yellow hair was bound by a fillet of woven green jade links, circling her forehead just below two delicate, feathery antennae, which swept upward and backward like a pair of dainty plumes.

As he stood staring down at her, scarcely believing his eyes, she suddenly faded from his view.

The Earthman blinked and looked again. But where she had stood he now saw only the rushes which had been bent downward by the weight of her tiny body.

Faintly he heard the fluttering of wings overhead. He looked up and saw only the empty sky. Suddenly a little pixie voice, musical as a silver bell, broke the silence.

“I know you now, man of the Old Race,” it said. “You are Sheb Takkor, the younger. You have saved the life of Eriné, daughter of the Vil of the Ulfi, and she is not ungrateful. Hold out your hand.”

In obedient wonder, he extended his hand. A glittering something dropped into his palm. He saw that it was a tiny ring fashioned from platinum and set with a sparkling green gem.

“If you should ever need the Ulfi, rub the jewel and if there is an Ulf within scent of the ring he will be yours to command.”

“Very kind of you,” said Thorne, “but…” He suddenly realized that the fluttering had stopped. He was talking to empty air.

Yirl Du had come down the bank and was surveying him quizzically. “Your pardon, my lord. Were you speaking to me?”

“Yes. No. I was speaking to an Ulf – that is, to an Ulf maiden.”

“Has one of the Little People paid us a visit?”

“Not intentionally, I guess. You see, she was struck down by that bat.” Thorne indicated the carcass. “I saw her fall, thinking her only a butterfly, yet I pitied the creature and so slew the bat with a javelin. She became invisible and presented me with this.” He held out the ring.

Yirl Du exclaimed with astonishment. “Why, that is indeed a precious thing, my lord, and such a gift as only the Vil of the Ulfi or a member of his family might present to a man.”

“She named herself Eriné, daughter of the Vil.”

Thorne was brimming over with questions about the Little People, but resolved to curb his curiosity until he could talk to Thaine or Lal Vak. Sheb Takkor, he reasoned, would be supposed to know these things. To question Yirl Du about them would be to make him suspect either that he was not Sheb Takkor, or that he had taken leave of his senses.