Upcoming Short Reviews & Shadow Over Alfheim: A Necropsy

I keep putting off doing new short reviews. I’ve got quite a few stories I could talk about, but I keep getting distracted by shiny things like Jack Vance, Leigh Bracket and Algis Budrys. Tomorrow, I’ll knock out “Time is Money” by Haskell Barkin just to finally put the January 76 issue behind me. I’ll talk some about the ’74 issue I have (it’s not all bad), but I’m probably going to try to get through those quickly so I can dive into the stack of Astounding I have.

I gotta say, those suckers have some flimsy covers! Unlike the 70s F&SF, which are perfect-bound to a card-stock cover, the 40s & 50s Astounding are staple-bound with a gloss paper cover (the same thickness as a regular page, though of a less sturdy fiber)  which is glued with a very sparse bit of adhesive to a spine that is hardly flush. As such, you have a booklet that is quite well held together, but virtually all of the covers are coming off because they aren’t aren’t glued to a solid block of papers but to 8 or so individual micro-spines. I doubt if even half of the issues I have will have covers that stand up to another read. But I’m here for great stories, not collectibility, so I’m prepared to sacrifice the physicality for the spirituality in the name of evangelizing science fiction. The Planet Stories might be another matter, because every blemish on those (already ragged, admittedly) covers is a crime against art…

Sad to say, Alfheim is now completely defunct. Player absences and drama-llamas have hammered the final nails in a game that should’ve ended back in late March or April.

I’ll give a rundown of how much was left, though everyone who has regularly followed those posts probably has an idea of how things would go down.

-The Zombraire’s Estate module would be resolved; admittedly, it wasn’t well tied into my story, but it was a blast to run, and I’m sad that I won’t get to finish it.

-The first of two goblin related missions would’ve been resolved. This would involve a relatively quick run through of the Old Island Fortress portion of the Morgansfort module; the party would be one of many teams made up of goblin shock troops cleaning out any monster down to the lower level so that the OIF would be a base for the Eastern goblin tribe. Resolving this would result in goblin allies from the east during the Alfort Siege

-The second of two goblin related missions would be presented and possibly resolved; the Orcs in the necromancer’s cave module would be turned into goblins for purpose of this scenario; it would’ve allow the party to end the war between the eastern and western goblin factions by ridding them of the necromancer (rewritten as a human acolyte of the elf king).

-The party would get sent to the Caelden’s Tomb (The Deathcrypt of Khaldun), find that the elf-king wasn’t home at the moment, retrieve the Book of Caelden after fighting the high-priest of Caeldun (originally the mummy of Khaldun) and the undead dragon. At this point, if the players have figured out that Richmond is Caelden, he would show up and take the book by force. The players have to make a dash back to Alfort.

-At that point, I’d run my Alfort tower defense scenario. Goblin allies would show up to help, the cavalry from the Imperial city would show up with an army of warrior priests to help turn the lesser undead and get folks out of the city. Depending on its outcome, the players would either stop Caelden then and there or be forced to admit defeat and abandon the Alfheim colony to its fate.

I probably could’ve got it all knocked out in about 8 more sessions (we were 2/3 of the way through!), but at this point, it seems like it would take an eternity and it’s not worth it to me at this point.

So, why did Alfheim die?

Part of the problem was that I made a sandbox a bit too big and a bit too unfocused.  But that only covers a small piece of the problem; if I’d had less content and pushed the story quicker, I could only say that I managed to finish before things fell apart for other reasons.  It could not have hurt, though, if I’d given the group a better idea of the scope and scale of content.

Originally, I’d hoped for Alfheim to be more of a drop-in game.  We had some drop-ins, but with one exception, they became drop-outs.  The group coalesced around a core group of players.  When core players began to have scheduling conflicts or drop-out for other reasons, there wasn’t enough of a group left to work with the (admittedly bloated) scale that Alfheim had taken on; I could run for 4 players, but not easily for 3, and I wasn’t able to fill spots.

Finally, and most relevant to the game’s demise, you can’t maintain a long-running game if problems spring up with or between players.  You can do your best to alleviate it or mitigate it, but when there are players who either can’t stand each other or are simply intolerable to the group, you can’t keep that group together, no matter how much you wish and hope that people can get along, even if only long enough to finish a game.

DMs can’t actually control everything; sometimes a game can stall out and die from reasons that are no fault of their own.  Or at least that’s what I’m telling myself.

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Shadow Over Alfheim Pt 16b: The Zombraire’s Estate

Once the party had been pointed in the direction of their adventure hook, they went to the farmlands west of the fort, the last place anyone had seen a zombie cow.  These monsters seemed to be originating from the direction of Sigyfel’s Tomb, but the Cleric, the only member who had been on that first adventure, knew that the tomb was small and not the source of the troubles.  Outside the tomb, the fighter discovered some “not quite leather” that had torn off one of the zombie cows on a trail nearby.  The party followed the gory trail of blood, fur and hoof prints through the scrublands and beyond into the wooded swamps.

The party heard a distant groaning “moo” in the distance.  The goblin thief climbed a tree and was able to spot an undead bovine staggering awkwardly and bumping into trees.  The party set upon it and quickly dispatched it, though they were a bit surprised by how much punishment it could take.  They continued on in the direction it had come from until the trees gave way to a clearing with an obvious and large graveyard between them and the wall of surrounding the estate.

Rather than poking around in the graveyard, or even going around the wall to the south gate, the party -starting with the goblin thief- decided to scale the wall.  This was an interesting choice, because it allowed me to show the party the entire layout of the estate (NW: barn, SW: undead chicken coop, NE: manor house, SE: undead garden) and gave the party a lot of options to try to launch a surprise attack.  What they ended up doing resulted in a ridiculous cascading encounter which everyone agreed was pretty epic.

The party saw the 7 zombie elves (4 women, 1 man, 2 children) working in the garden just south of the manor house; instead of jumping into the fray, they leapt from the wall onto the roof of the manor house.  Given that the roof was in somewhat bad shape, I kept making rolls to see if anyone fell through, but no one did.  The party unsuccessfully tried to ambush the family of zombies, never quite sure whether they should stay on the roof or climb down and fight.  The zombies seemed remarkably tough because I didn’t bother to tell the players that arrows did minimum damage and blunt did half.  The cleric tried and successfully turned 3 of them, but the other 4 ran into the manor.

(By this point, everyone realized that they’d forgotten to do anything with the lead-entombed crown; it was determined that the mage was still carrying it in his knapsack.)

I gave the party a few moment to figure out what they wanted to do before a wraith rose up from the roof to attack the players who weren’t on the ground.  The party managed to kill the wraith, largely thanks to the new fighter, but not before the mage and thief got energy drained.  I haven’t quite settled on how I’m going to handle it, but I’m thinking of an XP deficit, rather than an out and out loss of level.  I think my players are more scared not knowing.  “The wraith strikes you.  You feel sad.”  “What happens?” “All of the joy in life has left you.  You feel as though all you’ve been doing is meaningless.  The treasures seek are worthless and those which you’ve found, you know you’ll never get to sell, and even if you do, what will it even matter?”

Meanwhile, the remaining zombie elf women are hacking the cleric up.  The mage holds up his bleeding body with a floating disc while the fighter cuts through the zombies, but he doesn’t realize he’s offering the cleric up on a plate.  Of course, all the commotion has alerted the Zombraire; half a dozen of his pet stirges crash through the thatched roofing as they soar into the sky.  That’s when the mage makes one of the best uses of Sleep I’ve ever seen: “How high up are the Stirges?” “About 150 feet in the air or so.” “What’s the range on Sleep?” “Let me check…  240 feet.”  “I cast sleep on the Stirges!”  Everyone dives out of the way as stirges go splat around them, careening into the undead plants.  A purple bolt is fired from a window in the tower, striking the goblin thief as the party finishes slaughtering the zombies (who had been dealing wicked damage in rolled plain sight).

“Well, you’re surrounded by death: dead elves, dead stirges, undead plants, a million flies and the stench is unbearable.  What do you do?”

Go into the manor, of course!

The party makes it into the great hall just as the Zombraire has made his way down from the tower.  He was going to blast the party with an illusionary fireball cast from his wand of illusions, but everyone made their saves.  “He waves the wand at you…  And seems incredibly surprised that nothing seems to have happened.”  Having taken a hit, the Zombraire tried to make a run for it.  The fighter caught him before he could get very far or cast more spells, cutting him down on the stairs of his tower.  If he could’ve gotten his mirror image off, things might have been very different.

The party was now free to search the manor, found some swag, and burned some rot-grubs off the goblin thief.  Though Richmond is under some suspicion and the party clearly isn’t going to give him the crown right away if at all, I was happy that the party discussed which items he might be interested in.  We finally called it a night because I warned that any further exploration of the Estate would probably lead to an encounter almost as big as the last one.

So, thoughts on the Zombraire’s Estate module!

This is one of the mini modules from BFRPG’s free Adventure Anthology 1.  Though it’s been teased at for some time, I didn’t ever know when I was going to get to finally run it.  I hadn’t looked at this module in two months and still managed to run it by the seat of my pants and everyone had a great time.  That alone is a sign of a quality supplement for a DM.  I screwed up the placement of two rooms (transposing the bedroom with the kitchen) in the manor and as such lost a minor set-piece encounter that would’ve ended with the cleric turning the skeleton maids to dust the first round, but I’m okay with that.  The wand of illusions is going to introduce some fun chaos to my game, but will be balanced by the fact that damn near everything has been undead.

So long as I can answer “why would the elves have an undead farm?” sufficiently with “because they’re terrible and evil”, ZE fits nicely into the Alfheim setting.

After Maze of Nuromen, this has probably been one of my favorite modules to run, even if I only get two sessions out of it.  Depending on how you let things play out, there could be anywhere from as many as a dozen encounters to two or three monstrous battles.  I don’t know how things will turn out with the barn, the zombie chickens, and the rats in the graveyard, but I think my players would concur that a fight against several zombies, stirges, a wraith and an elven zombie wizard was sufficiently awesome.

Shadow Over Alfheim Pt 16a: What to Do With the Elf King’s Crown?

There’s been a bit of a shakeup in the Alfheim group as of late. The goblin has finals, and the fighter has a conflicting schedule with a new job, but we got a caster back and have a new fighter player. The abbey-monk was unable to make it to this session, so we had Cleric, new fighter, mage and goblin thief.

First we had to get a few things out of the way. Old fighter who may not be rejoining us woke up in the pre-dawn hours, mumbling incoherently about a ghostly blue stag with more points on its antlers than he’d ever seen, grabs his stuff and goes running after it. This is a workable in-game explanation for his absence because said fighter was exiled to Alfheim for poaching deer in the imperial reserve and was also kind of crazy. Goblin who is busy with finals has been completely out of sorts after having put on Caelden’s crown in the catacomb beneath Law’s End. After establishing this, I hurry everyone along back to town so the new member of the group can be brought in.

The party left Alfort in mediocre shape and returned to find that things had gotten worse. Everyone was dour, down in the dumps, and just seemed beat. As though the life had been drained out of them. Maybe too subtle? But there’s plenty of time for the gang to figure out what’s really up. The party ran into the crazy old bluesman at the inn, who seemingly pulled the Crown of Caelden out of thin air, laughed, and warned them that they’d better get it out of Alfheim, because the king was looking for it. This had the party pretty freaked. They are still unsure whether the bluesman is a real person or not or some sort of evil ghost apparition or illusion of the elves. But they do know that dudes who can be found playing their lute down at the crossroads in the middle of a ruined elven empire late at night are probably bad news.

After this brief encounter, the party spent an interminable amount of time trying to figure out what to do with the Crown. Part of this was my fault, because I’d built it up just enough that the players overestimated its significance to both the King and to the story. And that kind of encouraged me to run with it.

Their initial inclination to give it to Richmond was put aside quickly after the incident with the bluesman. Having it made them incredibly paranoid; you’d’ve thought it was the One Ring or something based on how they went about things. Their first idea was to try to make a replica of it (ostensibly to try to pass off to Richmond). There was a two-fold problem with this plan: Alfort didn’t have a goldsmith and the crown was a masterwork that had been intricately carved with Bosch-like scenes and had life-like screaming faces on its points. It would take at least 6 months for a master goldsmith to come up with even a passable facsimile.

The next option the party went for was to try to destroy the crown. The goblin thief failed to hit it with his mace; each time tried, it would stop a few inches short and he would hear “Hail, master” in his head (except for when he got a natural 20 later during the second attempt, I let him get a dent in, and his cursed mace said “Forgive me master”). The cleric managed to smack it with his silver mace. “You hit it. Your head is filled with a thousand screaming voices.” The cleric falls to the floor (his choice, not my ruling). I told them they managed to put a pretty solid dent in it. The mage takes it to the blacksmith and after some dubious negotiations convinces the smith to let him use the hammer and anvil to smash the thing. He takes a few whacks at it -being crazy- just to listen to the screams. He manages to hammer it into a pancake and brings it back to the inn, where the cleric is still lying on the floor (“am I still on the floor?” “I don’t know, do you want to still be on the floor? Everyone in the inn is looking at you guys like you’re crazy.”)

I decide to ratchet things up a notch while they’re trying to decide what to do with the ruined crown. I tell them that it’s starting to slowly resume its original shape like something out of a David Lynch movie. They beat and bash at it more, thoroughly ruining the table (which the cleric generously paid for). They ultimately decide that they needed to find some way to sink it in the sea (though there were some game-derailing ideas floated that would’ve turned things into a quest for a non-existent Mt. Doom), so made a mold to encase it in lead.

The cleric took some time to speak with the Querillite priests, who informed him that they’ve sent for warrior priests to come to the aid of the land. The players mistook the information about escape tunnels out of the city from below the chapel as a new dungeon, but I’ll let them figure that one out on their own. The fighter wanted to do a training montage type thing, so he went to the parade/training ground where he found the guards to be in an incredibly lax state. He was approached by a lieutenant who told him about the situation, with several guards having abandoned their posts, going awol and needing some sort of leadership to whip things back into shape. Also, he hooked him with the stories of the zombie cows that had been wandering into the nearby farmlands and said he could see if there might be some reward for helping take care of it. Finally, the goblin thief and mage asked about possible travel by boat either up the coast or to Estport, but none of the little fishing skiffs were particularly sea-worthy, nor did any of the fishers know when abouts the next real ship would be by.

Continued in part 2, when the party has a massive encounter with undead elves.

Vox Day Xanatos Gambit Update

Before, Vox Day’s opponents were spending a lot of effort to convince me that Vox Day was evil genius mastermind.  Today, Vox Day confirms they were right.

Pictured: Vox & Space Bunny Day celebrate things coming together as planned.

Pictured: Vox & Space Bunny Day celebrate things coming together as planned.

Later this week, I’ll be sharing my thoughts on the Fan Writers Category (expect some shilling), posting a partial review of the BFRPG module Zombraire’s Estate (Shadow Over Alfheim), and more Short Reviews.

I don’t know if I’ll really review Red Dragon Inn, but I will go ahead and say “I love this game, I want it and I want all of the decks and I wish it wouldn’t cost me close to $200 to get all of the decks.”

It’ll be a little while longer before I can continue my Bar-Lev series; I got my dad Ogre as an early birthday present, and we played it 4 times, leaving no time to set up another round of Bar-Lev.  He said it was the coolest new board game he’d played in years.  Considering his tastes in board games, that’s saying something.  The only thing that’s a surprise to me was that he’d somehow missed it in the first place.

Shadow Over Alfheim Pt 15: The Second Death of Nuromen

The latest session of of my B/X game saw the wild mage rejoining the party (yay! another arcane caster!). The conclusion of the run of the Maze of Nuromen was complicated slightly by the loss of the original player’s map from nearly a year ago and the player who normally maps’ absence that night. Fortunately, the second floor is mostly a straight run.

The party was looking for the Crown of Caelden. Some of the players didn’t know why (or had forgotten why) they had come back to the Maze (this had to do mostly with the fact that there have been several interruptions that have led to several weeks between sessions), but a quick reminder of the hooks that had led them there got us back into the swing of things.

The party remembered the hall of statues – mostly that the statues had been trapped – so rather than muck about further, they pressed northward. At the 4-way junction, they took the left to the dead-end empty room. The walls were covered in scratch marks; one of the hallmarks of my elves (since they’re ghouls) is the long clawed fingers with which they incessantly scrape along the walls as they shamble down haunted corridors. The clawmarks led back to the priest’s room, where the skeletal body had been moved onto its bed.

My players didn’t find the secret door in the priest’s chamber, but they did find the chute below the sacrificial basin in the temple of the evil ape god. Now let me say that Maze of Nuromen has given me a lot of places to fudge things, rewrite the rooms and improvise to insert things into the Alfheim setting. The giant doors of horrors & debauchery in the main hall have given me kind of the idea that every room here (whether described or not) is covered in bizarre Hieronymus Bosch-like paintings and reliefs. The party was amazingly paranoid that the 8-armed statue would come to life and kill them all (they still remembered those obsidian living statues back in Stull which they never managed to kill), and luckily for them, that paranoia kept them from catching leprosy (curse); they made sure their ropes were tied to the basin and not the statue.

They crawled down and made their way toward the crypt, killing the two elves who were posted as guards. I tried to make Nuromen’s entrance as dramatic as possible, rising from the ground while the party was examining the desicated remains. Nuromen gave the party a few moments to explain themselves and maybe get a clue (i don’t know if the party picked up on the fact that he pointed out that they had been serving Caelden all along and that HE was actually attempting to stand against his former lord in death, but he at least gave them a shot) before telling them he would no longer stand the tresspasses of those who’d defiled his grave and stole from his daughter. I was glad that the cleric used turning; having all of the bodies on the slabs burn to ash in a bright white flash was not only deemed pretty cool, it meant I didn’t have to muck around with miniatures. Very different from the previous boss fight.

I tried to keep Nuromen using spells, mostly; level drain is such a cruel and unusual punishment. Luckily for the party, Nuromen made crappy melee rolls. Unlucky for the party, very few characters had weapons that could hurt him; magic items are fairly sparse in my game, though a few characters had silver implements. I’ll admit, I DID pump Nuromen up a little bit HP-wise, but I kept his spell-list intact. Before playing as J’Rhazha, I would’ve maybe swapped out one or two of his spells for attack spells, but I decided having the cleric think that he burst into flames and roll around on the ground trying to put himself out was more fun than giving him another Magic Missile.

In the end, nobody died, Nuromen was defeated and they found Nuromen’s medallion in one of the piles of white ash. The group popped the secret door behind the statue (weeping elf-maiden; the Doctor Who fans were more freaked out by the statue than the Wraith, natch) and opened Nuromen’s vault. Thief makes his saving throw vs poison, the cleric does not; I’ve made a behind the screen executive decision that a failed save, rather than causing instant death, the effect instead is doing whatever a character’s current hit dice is in damage; rather than instant death, the 4th level cleric takes 4d6 damage. Doesn’t die, but comes close; he’s burned through the most healing of anybody this session.

After the cleric is patched up, goblin thief notes the pit full of spikes and the treasure on the other side. Goblin thief tries going down into the pit. He finds that the pit is full of treasure. He goes up the other side to check out obvious-trap because GREED! The party is filled with bolts. Ouch. The party manages to get the treasure hoarde out of the pit, but still no crown.

On the way out of the vault, the party comes across the back side of the secret door out of the caverns, where they find the hidden stash of treasure and the crown. Somehow, the skeletal hand with the sword had the party just as worried as some of the harder fights, but the cleric finally decided to try blasting it.

Goblin ranger finds the crown, puts it on, screams in agony, has visions of the elven king, hears over and over in his head “mine, it’s mine”, loses 2 charisma.

“Looks like this is the right crown.”

I’m not sure what the party plans on doing with it, but someone mentioned taking it to Richmond. Richmond was actually waiting for them outside of the ruins of Laws End, and was going to pull a Rene Belloq, but he decided to hang back and watch what happens. The only hint that something was amiss was the howling of wolves in the hills surrounding the ruin.

So, at last, I think I’ve exhausted content from Maze of Nuromen, but I sure got a lot of play out of this one module. The only thing the party never found was the troglodyte cave, and they did not bother to re-check the library to find that Nuromen had gotten his spellbook back with the help of his ‘apprentice’. I doubt the players will be back this way until the showdown at Caelden’s crypt, but until then, the Maze is behind them. There are a little over two weeks before the goblins launch their attack on the Old Island Fortress, but there are a few adventure hooks left to tide them over. Most importantly, i think everyone will be about level 4 by now, so I can start throwing a few tougher things at them. Content-wise, I’ve still got Zombraire’s Estate to run, though the cleric and the abbey monk very well might cut a swath through that one. They never finished Malek. Now might be a good time to run Cave of the Unknown, but I’d rather wait until after the battle for the Old Island fortress if I can help it. Malek may never be finished; things may be too far in motion for Caelden’s plan to sit on the backburner for a nifty but unnecessary artifact to add to his collection.

Anyway, Richmond will be meeting the party in Alfort when they get back and see what they want to do with that Crown.

.

Shadow Over Alfheim Pt 14 – Mirror Image is a Pretty Brutal Spell

I think I may have underestimated this spell a bit in the past, but when given to an evil NPC, things turn into the last big fight from the end of the old TMNT Arcade game. Which was pretty sweet.

We had everyone all back together for the first time this year. The party started the session on the bluff looking down over the ruins of Law’s End. The ghostly procession that descends into the valley and beyond toward the mountains each night from the crossroads at dusk had passed. The goblin with low-light vision was able to see that 8 skeletons were milling about the ruins of the elven city rather purposelessly. I had the skeletons, who were specifically noted as being unarmed, there just for funzies to see what the players would do and my group did not disappoint.

Despite having two cleric types in the party who could’ve easily blasted the skeletons into oblivion, the party discussed and attempted to engage in all sorts of weird strategies, essentially making fools of themselves, using both magic and mundane lighting sources for illumination, and the fighter clumsily searching the grounds thinking that the skeletons had been looking for something, all while the skeletons formed two lines of 4 on either side of the path to the entrance of the Maze. Just waiting.

The party assumed that either something was coming out of the maze to meet them or something was going to arrive that the skeletons were welcoming. It took awhile for the party to figure out it was them the skeletons were welcoming. Finally, the cleric of St. Cuthbert tried to turn them. They immediately fell to pieces (they were 1hp monsters) in 8 nice little piles forming two lines of 4 on either side of the path to the entrance of the Maze. The thief smashed all of the skulls systematically.

Meanwhile, the Cleric was getting ready to tie some ropes to go back down into the base of the tower when he discovered that there was already a rope ladder in place. Cue the collective “uh oh”.

The party managed to get down the tower, go across the underground river, down the stairs, and to the great chamber.

A party always knows trouble is ahead when you ask for marching order. And trouble they got. The brazier in the center of the room bursts into flames, and the party is approached by an unrecognizably charred black version of their former companion. Questions were asked and answered, though the party didn’t ask anything that revealed relevant story information. On the plus side, they’re beginning to doubt that Lord Richmond’s on the level.

The encounter consisted of 8 undead giant insects, 2 “elves” (ghouls) and a quasi-undead 4th level version of their old elf companion. I knew that the insects would be turned right away, and they were there to be turned, but it also was a tie in to when the elf learned the animate vermin spell from the Necromancers of Stull module.

Really, other than making him a weird and gross looking burned up bend’em man with rubies for eyes, this baddie was just a 4th level elf. His spells for the day were Animate Vermin, Mage Armor, and 2 Mirror Images.

I don’t think the party figured out that he’d cast Mage Armor, because they thought he was nightmarishly powerful: rather than simple “misses” for their ranged attacks, he’d swat them out of the air. That bit alone made him somewhat terrifying. That and the fact that there were 4 of him. Because the players weren’t familiar with the exact text of the Mirror Image spell, they assumed incorrectly that there was a “true” version of the elf. Once they got they got him down to 1, he managed to split off again, so they ended up fighting 7 of him in total.

Before he could split the first time, the elf was hit with a spear, and he didn’t have a lot of HP to begin with, but he was still a hard to kill badass and I’m going to have to come up with a penalty for the fighter who was KOed and then healed back up by the abbey monk.

It was great when the goblin-ranger finally killed him:

“Can I have your eyes?”
“If you take the Crown from this place, make sure it does not fall into His hands…”
“That’s cool, dude, gimme your eyes.”

Former PC as Boss-fight

The elf in our party had to drop out for personal reasons, but that doesn’t mean that the character has magically disappeared from the land of Alfheim.

When he was last involved, he had three spellbooks, his own, Nuromen’s book of 1st level spells and a book of 1st level spells from one of the necromancers of Stull, and he was practicing with Taramedes, the resident mage of Alfort/Morgansfort. Well, during the party’s absence in Portsdam and Malek, Taramedes’ house burned down and no one has seen hide or hair of the elf.

He’ll be waiting for the party in the Maze of Nuromen. He’ll be undead and scary, completely burned to a crisp, an apprentice to Nuromen and 4th level.

His purpose there will be:
-to let the party know about the crown treasure in the module
-to answer a few questions about what’s going on with Caelden, what Nuromen’s relationship with him was, and how the party has been playing into the elf king’s hands (if they ask the right questions)
-to build some dynamic continuity and get the players a bit more invested in the world
-to have a sweet boss fight.  We haven’t had a sweet boss fight since Stull.

Welcome! It took you long enough. I was beginning to think you’d never arrive. Well here we all are.

While only one of us came here invited, your coming was expected. He’s looking for his crown, you know. Caelden. I assume you’re here for it, as well.

You have no idea what we’ve started, do you? I suppose you have questions. Fair enough. You deserve to at least know the part you’ve played in this ruinous affair. Nuromen has granted me the liberty of answering you each one thing before you go poking about and defiling his resting place. But know this: you cannot be allowed to leave here alive.

If you find the crown, you must get it out of Alfheim by any means possible. Do not let it fall into Lord Caelden’s hands.